My book on depression
Tuesday, September 19, 2017 at 11:21AM
[Chris Phillips]

Published by Floris of Edinburgh on 27th August 2017, the book is called Treating Depression Naturally: How Flower Essences Can Rebalance Your Life. The first two chapters can be read on the Floris website.

It’s available from bookshops, Floris themselves and, of course, from Amazon, who provide a reasonably priced Kindle download.

Treating different forms of depression

The approach I take is to look at a wide variety of different forms of depression and related ailments, so there are chapters on general depression, hormonal depression, SAD, anger and depression, and severe depression and suicidal thoughts. And related subjects such as OCD, low self esteem, insomnia, psychological trauma, loss, mourning and grief, and abuse are covered as well.

Generally speaking the structure of each chapter is to explore its special topic and then select remedies from 5 different essence makers to address the individual’s problems at the detailed level. Thus the chapter on chemical depression – which usually results from an addiction to recreational or pharmaceutical drugs or alcohol – shows essences which deal, for example, with addiction as a family pattern, or with feelings of unendurable desolation, or with a tendency to sabotage oneself or one’s goals.

Five flower essence makers

The format makes it an easy matter to home in on a particular area of difficulty dealt with in the 20 chapters, and then select essences at a high level of detail. The 5 makers – Dr Bach, Bailey essences (from the UK), Australian Bush, the Flower Essence Society of California and Pacific essences of Canada – have been chosen because their ranges cover the full variety of the human condition. Not that they are the best, indeed there are several other fine makers nowadays who cover the ground extremely well, but these 5 have been chosen for their variety and manageability – to try to include every maker would have been confusing and counterproductive.

The book is heavily illustrated - mostly with flowers mentioned in the text - easy to use, and (in my opinion at least!) beautifully produced.

Article originally appeared on Flower Therapy (http://flower-therapy.co.uk/).
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